Archive for the Turkish Angora category

About the Cat Fancier’s Association

Are you interested in finding a purebred cat? As you shop for your cat, you may notice the initials CFA in some advertisements. What exactly does this mean? CFA stands for the Cat Fancier’s Association, the largest purebred cat registry in the world. The CFA was created to maintain breed standards and register litters of purebred kittens. In addition, this association holds cat shows, where cats are judged to see how closely they adhere to their breed’s standard. The CFA recognizes only forty one breeds of cats.

When a breeder registers a litter of kittens with the Cat Fancier’s Association, he or she has the option of deciding that the kitten cannot be bred. Only cats with a pin number on their registration forms will be eligible to have their kittens registered. This allows the breeders to continue to better their breeds. Once the litter is registered, each kitten will need to be individually registered by its new owner.

The CFA has placed the cat breeds it recognizes into three categories. These groups are the Championship Class, the Provisional Class, and the Miscellaneous Class. Each of the forty one breeds that the CFA recognizes is placed in one of these groups. When cats are shown, they must win first place in their breed and then their class before they can compete for the title of best in show.

Cats in the Championship Class are those who are solidly established cat breeds. The breeds in the Provisional Class have been more recently established and are still being closely watched to be sure they conform to the new breed standard. Finally, the one breed currently in the Miscellaneous Class is still having a breed standard created and cannot actually compete for the best in show title.

If you live in Canada, you have a second option. You can register your cat in the Canadian Cat Association. This association was formed by Canadians who did not want to register their cats with an association in another country. Other popular cat registries are the Traditional Cat Association, which supports original breed standards and does not uphold current trends that exaggerate breed characteristics, the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy, which is the United Kingdom’s cat registry, and the Fédération Internationale Féline, which is the European cat registry.

Although there are many breeds of cats, they all fit into one of two categories, short hair or long hair. Short hair cats include breeds such as the Abyssinian and the British Shorthair, while Norwegian Forest Cats and Turkish Angoras are representatives of long hair cats. Of the forty one CFA recognized cat breeds, the most popular is probably the American Shorthair, which has been in the United States for over 300 years. Although non-pedigreed pet cats often resemble this breed, it has actually been carefully and selectively bred for generation after generation to develop characteristics that would appear in every kitten. Other popular breeds are the Siamese, the Rex, the Main Coon, the Persian and the Ragdoll.

Just remember, a pedigree doesn’t make your kitten any more loving and affectionate. There are many wonderful pet cats without a pedigree. However, a pedigree does enable you to pick out a kitten that will have certain characteristics.

Is the Turkish Angora Right For You?

If you want a longhair cat breed that is as intelligent as it is beautiful, you may want to take a look at the beautiful Turkish Angora. This breed is one of the oldest cat breeds, originating in the fourteen hundreds in Turkey. For some time, cat fanciers thought that the Angora was extinct, since imported cats had been bred so frequently to Persians to improve the Persian coat that Angoras in other countries died out. Luckily, Turkey was more careful to preserve this ancient breed. At first, this country refused to part with any Angoras. However, finally Turkey agreed to sell a few cats and some pure Turkish Angoras were imported to Europe and America after World War II.

The Turkish Angora is an elegant, graceful looking cat breed. This cat has a long, muscular body that is covered with a silky coat of long, luxurious hair. The Angora has a triangular face, big, slightly slanted eyes, and a long, fluffy tail. This breed can have eyes of any color, including mismatched eyes. These cats weigh six to eleven pounds.

You can find a Turkish Angora in almost any color or pattern. However, not all variations in pattern are recognized by the different breed organizations, so if you want to show your cat, you should be sure that that particular color is acceptable.

If you want a quiet, placid cat breed, then the Turkish Angora may be the wrong choice for you. These cats are fairly vocal and love to communicate with their family members. They tend to suddenly leap up to race around the house after some imaginary pest. The Angora is quite playful and loves to spend time romping with family members. However, if you give your cat a ball, he will amuse himself for hours, as well.

The Turkish Angora loves to explore his surroundings and is very curious. This means that these cats can really get into trouble if they are unsupervised. If you decide that an Angora kitten is right for you, you should really make every effort to cat proof your home. After all, even though these cats don’t make the same mistake twice, sometimes one mistake is simply one too many. If you are not home for most of the day, your cat can entertain himself and will not be desolate to find that he is alone. However, he will be happier with the company of a second cat.

While the Turkish Angora has a long coat, you do not have to spend hours grooming your cat. This breed has a silky coat that tends to stay tangle free. Combing your cat’s hair two to three times a week should be frequent enough to keep it from tangling and matting. In addition, regular grooming helps remove loose hair and will alleviate the chance of your cat developing hairballs.

If you want a graceful, playful cat with a long, silky coat, then the Turkish Angora may be the perfect cat breed for you.

Do You Want To Find a Purebred Cat?

Do You Want To Find a Purebred Cat?

by Niall Kennedy

For some of us, a common-or-garden Tom cat is not enough. We want quality feline company with a pedigree and the only way to guarantee that a cat is a purebreed is to contact one of the national cat associations or similar organisations in other countries.

To find a purebred cat, you may start with the Cat Fancier’s Association. The CFA was created to maintain breed standards and to register litters as purebreds. The association also holds cat shows and judges them based on how closely they adhere to the standards. They recognize only 41 breeds of cats.

The breeder registers a litter of kittens with the Cat Fancier’s Association. Then they have the option of deciding whether or not to allow the kitten to be bred. Only cats with a pin number on their registration forms will be eligible to have their kittens registered. This allows the breeders to continue to better their breeds. Once the litter is registered, each kitten will need to be individually registered by its new owner.

There are three categories of recognized cats. They are the Championship Class, the Provisional Class, and the Miscellaneous Class. Each bred that the CFA recognizes is in one of these groups. They must win first place in their breed and then their class before they can compete for the title of best in show.

The Championship Class are those cats who are established cat breeds. The breeds in the Provisional Class have been more recently established. They are still being watched to insure that they conform to the new breed standard. Finally, the one breed currently in the Miscellaneous Class is still having a breed standard created and cannot actually compete for the best in show title.

In Canada, you can register your cat in the Canadian Cat Association. This association was formed by Canadians who did not want to register their cats with an association in another country. There are other popular cat registries including the Traditional Cat Association, which supports original breed standards and does not uphold current trends that exaggerate breed characteristics, the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy, which is the United Kingdom’s cat registry, and the Fédération Internationale Féline, which is the European cat registry.

All cats fit into one of two categories. They are either short hair or long haired. Short haired are breeds like the Abyssinian and British Shorthair. The long haired beads include Turkish Angora and Norwegian Forest Cats. The most popular of them all is the American Shorthair which has been in the US for over 300 years. They have been carefully bred for generations to develop characteristics that would appear in each kitten born. Others include the Siamese, the Rex, the Main Coon, the Ragdoll and the Persian.

Choosing a cat with a pedigree allows you to choose a cat that has the characteristics that you want it to have. They are no more affectionate than other cats but they can be a prized possession no matter what.

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About the Author

Best Pet Health Information is a resource that brings you information and news, tips and reviews to help find cat medication for your pedigree feline. http://www.Best-Pet-Health.info Copyright Best-Pet-Health.info All rights reserved. This article may be reprinted in full so long as the resource box and the live links are included intact.

Source: Article Search Engine: GoArticles.com



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