Archive for the British Shorthair category

About the Cat Fancier’s Association

Are you interested in finding a purebred cat? As you shop for your cat, you may notice the initials CFA in some advertisements. What exactly does this mean? CFA stands for the Cat Fancier’s Association, the largest purebred cat registry in the world. The CFA was created to maintain breed standards and register litters of purebred kittens. In addition, this association holds cat shows, where cats are judged to see how closely they adhere to their breed’s standard. The CFA recognizes only forty one breeds of cats.

When a breeder registers a litter of kittens with the Cat Fancier’s Association, he or she has the option of deciding that the kitten cannot be bred. Only cats with a pin number on their registration forms will be eligible to have their kittens registered. This allows the breeders to continue to better their breeds. Once the litter is registered, each kitten will need to be individually registered by its new owner.

The CFA has placed the cat breeds it recognizes into three categories. These groups are the Championship Class, the Provisional Class, and the Miscellaneous Class. Each of the forty one breeds that the CFA recognizes is placed in one of these groups. When cats are shown, they must win first place in their breed and then their class before they can compete for the title of best in show.

Cats in the Championship Class are those who are solidly established cat breeds. The breeds in the Provisional Class have been more recently established and are still being closely watched to be sure they conform to the new breed standard. Finally, the one breed currently in the Miscellaneous Class is still having a breed standard created and cannot actually compete for the best in show title.

If you live in Canada, you have a second option. You can register your cat in the Canadian Cat Association. This association was formed by Canadians who did not want to register their cats with an association in another country. Other popular cat registries are the Traditional Cat Association, which supports original breed standards and does not uphold current trends that exaggerate breed characteristics, the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy, which is the United Kingdom’s cat registry, and the Fédération Internationale Féline, which is the European cat registry.

Although there are many breeds of cats, they all fit into one of two categories, short hair or long hair. Short hair cats include breeds such as the Abyssinian and the British Shorthair, while Norwegian Forest Cats and Turkish Angoras are representatives of long hair cats. Of the forty one CFA recognized cat breeds, the most popular is probably the American Shorthair, which has been in the United States for over 300 years. Although non-pedigreed pet cats often resemble this breed, it has actually been carefully and selectively bred for generation after generation to develop characteristics that would appear in every kitten. Other popular breeds are the Siamese, the Rex, the Main Coon, the Persian and the Ragdoll.

Just remember, a pedigree doesn’t make your kitten any more loving and affectionate. There are many wonderful pet cats without a pedigree. However, a pedigree does enable you to pick out a kitten that will have certain characteristics.

Is the British Shorthair the Perfect Cat For You?

If your home has a rodent problem, then you must not own a British Shorthair. These big cats may look placid and lazy, but they are actually great hunters. After all, the British Shorthair is descended from Britain’s barn and house cats.

This breed was created in the late nineteenth century. Despite its early popularity, the British Shorthair almost became extinct in the mid twentieth century, as other breeds were developed. Luckily, a few Shorthair fanciers were determined to save this wonderful, historic breed and the British Shorthair was saved. In the late twentieth century, these cats reached the United States, where they immediately became extremely popular.

Although you can find a British Shorthair in a wide range of colors, including orange eyed or blue eyed white, red or silver tabby, tortoiseshell, smoke, bicolors, and points, the most popular color is probably blue. In fact, blue British Shorthairs were so popular in the United States that they were the only color recognized by cat associations for many years. This color, called the British Blue, almost disappeared after World War II. Dedicated cat fanciers bred the remaining British Blues to Blue Persians to increase the gene pool and save this beautiful cat.

This breed is on the large side, weighing in at a hefty nine to eighteen pounds. British Shorthair cats have a short tail that is on the broad side, a round head with wide cheeks, and a thick, short coat.

Although the British Shorthair is fairly laid back, this is not a breed that is interested in being picked up and cuddled. In fact, these cats hate being picked up or handled so much that many cat fanciers say that they should be re-named the ‘four feet on the ground’ breed. As long as you allow him to do his own thing, your Shorthair will be happy. If you are looking for a cat that wants to snuggle in your lap as you watch television, you may be quite disappointed with the British Shorthair breed.

For people who can’t spend a lot of time at home, this cat breed is ideal. The British Shorthair is very self contained and does not spend a lot of time playing or socializing. As long as you are there to feed him each morning and can give him a little attention each evening, he will be a happy cat.

Since this breed is a descendant of several gene pools, it is generally a healthy breed. However, there is one thing you should be aware of. While most cats have Type-A blood, many British Shorthairs have the more rare Type-B blood type. You should consider having your kitten tested to find out which type of blood he has in case he needs emergency surgery in the future. You should be sure to have your veterinarian make a note of your cat’s blood type in his medical chart so that there are no unnecessary complications.

Since these cats have such thick, coarse coats, you will need to do very little grooming. However, you should comb through your Shorthair’s coat once a week to remove loose hair and dirt.

If you need an undemanding cat, then the British Shorthair may be the perfect choice for you.

Do You Want To Find a Purebred Cat?

Do You Want To Find a Purebred Cat?

by Niall Kennedy

For some of us, a common-or-garden Tom cat is not enough. We want quality feline company with a pedigree and the only way to guarantee that a cat is a purebreed is to contact one of the national cat associations or similar organisations in other countries.

To find a purebred cat, you may start with the Cat Fancier’s Association. The CFA was created to maintain breed standards and to register litters as purebreds. The association also holds cat shows and judges them based on how closely they adhere to the standards. They recognize only 41 breeds of cats.

The breeder registers a litter of kittens with the Cat Fancier’s Association. Then they have the option of deciding whether or not to allow the kitten to be bred. Only cats with a pin number on their registration forms will be eligible to have their kittens registered. This allows the breeders to continue to better their breeds. Once the litter is registered, each kitten will need to be individually registered by its new owner.

There are three categories of recognized cats. They are the Championship Class, the Provisional Class, and the Miscellaneous Class. Each bred that the CFA recognizes is in one of these groups. They must win first place in their breed and then their class before they can compete for the title of best in show.

The Championship Class are those cats who are established cat breeds. The breeds in the Provisional Class have been more recently established. They are still being watched to insure that they conform to the new breed standard. Finally, the one breed currently in the Miscellaneous Class is still having a breed standard created and cannot actually compete for the best in show title.

In Canada, you can register your cat in the Canadian Cat Association. This association was formed by Canadians who did not want to register their cats with an association in another country. There are other popular cat registries including the Traditional Cat Association, which supports original breed standards and does not uphold current trends that exaggerate breed characteristics, the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy, which is the United Kingdom’s cat registry, and the Fédération Internationale Féline, which is the European cat registry.

All cats fit into one of two categories. They are either short hair or long haired. Short haired are breeds like the Abyssinian and British Shorthair. The long haired beads include Turkish Angora and Norwegian Forest Cats. The most popular of them all is the American Shorthair which has been in the US for over 300 years. They have been carefully bred for generations to develop characteristics that would appear in each kitten born. Others include the Siamese, the Rex, the Main Coon, the Ragdoll and the Persian.

Choosing a cat with a pedigree allows you to choose a cat that has the characteristics that you want it to have. They are no more affectionate than other cats but they can be a prized possession no matter what.

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About the Author

Best Pet Health Information is a resource that brings you information and news, tips and reviews to help find cat medication for your pedigree feline. http://www.Best-Pet-Health.info Copyright Best-Pet-Health.info All rights reserved. This article may be reprinted in full so long as the resource box and the live links are included intact.

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